Happiness at Work Starts with #NoeMail

2 thoughts on “Happiness at Work Starts with #NoeMail”

  1. I feel Mindfulness and employee engagement go hand in hand. I was once asked this question, what does it take to be completely engaged at work? I had to borrow a statement from another interview which I felt was a huge revelation. ” A person becomes completely engaged at work, when he or she does not have even the time to think whether he is happy at work or not” – This is an indication. In other words, we are saying that we are so mindful at work “that we love what we do” and “do what we love”. One needs to be aware.

    Emails does give us the distractions. But to stay focused, one needs to manage these distractions as well. In my opinion, We cannot totally avoid emails, it is entirely up to us (the person who sends and responds) to make it interesting, useful and worthwhile.

    I agree with you when you say that “we need to stop appearing to be busy at work because people will think we are lazying about”. What others think about us should not matter to us as long as we are focused and do the right thing.

    Agree with you when you say that ” Change is all about providing the right conditions for people to decide for themselves”. It is also the responsibility of the leadership team to foster and nurture that kind of environment in organizations. I liked reading through your article. It was nice. Cheers, Ramkumar

    1. Hi Ramkumar, thanks a lot for dropping by and for the terrific comments! Much appreciated. I couldn’t just help noticing your quote shared above RE: ’A person becomes completely engaged at work, when he or she does not have even the time to think whether he is happy at work or not’, where we may need to take things here with a pinch of salt or two, because ’does not have even the time to think whether […]’ can imply treasuring The Cult of Busyiness, which may well not be what we should be going after, specially, for the very same reasons you shared above, i.e. not having enough time to pause, think and reflect about ourselves and the work we do. It’s a very slippery slope we should be aware of, because perhaps some people may take things a bit too literal altogether when they shouldn’t.

      RE: ’Emails does give us the distractions’, this is just a pretty interesting reflection as well, because, if anything, it confirms we may not have learned much, nor done enough about it either, about workplace distractions from when I posted this blog post where I talked about interruptions and the costs associated with them and perhaps with this killer quote I am certain you could relate to as well in that very same context: ‘We create our own distractions and just need to learn to manage them. Something to reflect upon when thinking about our daily email use…

      RE: ‘What others think about us should not matter to us as long as we are focused and do the right thing.’, another great comment that reminds me of how important and critical setting up the right expectations can well be in a workplace environment, because I suspect, when doing so, there wouldn’t be a need to have to worry about what others think about us, so many thanks for that lovely addition into the overall conversation.

      Finally, RE: What others think about us should not matter to us as long as we are focused and do the right thing., very much in agreement as well with your thoughts in this regard, which also reminds me about this other blog post I shared across just recently, where I reflected as well on the much needed re-thinking of traditional change management and how it needs to adjust more towards influencing change to take place with heavy involvement as well from senior leadership team(s) by providing the right conditions for change to take place.

      Many thanks, once again, for dropping by and for the lovely feedback comments! Much appreciated.

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