Is KM Dead? Larry Prusak, Dave Snowden, Patrick Lambe

7 thoughts on “Is KM Dead? Larry Prusak, Dave Snowden, Patrick Lambe”

  1. Go to Google Trends, type in knowledge management (comma) social networking. Been dead so long it’s starting to smell. The issue, as David and Larry clearly know, is that there is nothing that will take its place, because there is nothing we can offer that business executives (who get their knowledge from their subordinates, on demand) will appreciate to be valuable. The truth is that the principal means of obtaining and conveying knowledge continues to be, for all of us, what it has always been: context-rich, iterative, peer-to-peer conversations.

    Executives think everyone does this already and that it does not warrant investment, or a “chief conversation enablement officer”. Gen Millennium has learned to work around executive indifference to conversation enablement in the workplace and they use IM/VoIP, blogs/RSS, screen-sharing and other social tools to converse anytime, anywhere with anyone. What was once the “CKO” job is now, for those of us left, (a) enabling conversations, (b) adding meaning to information (“sensemaking”), and ( c) helping front-line people to use knowledge and technology tools and resources more effectively.

    This job is and always will be thankless and unappreciated. Over time we will teach each other to do it anyway, because we care about them and about doing a good job, and for no other reason.

    Pity the poor librarians, though, even less appreciated, who continue to believe there is value and future in just-in-case centralized collection, storage and transmission of raw content (what they were trained to do). And the poor IT folks, whose job has become how to put up and maintain useless websites, useless “groupware”, useless intranets with useless search tools and useless taxonomies, and to obstruct the use of social networking tools, to the point they and their stuff have become mere obstacles the rest of us have to work around to do our jobs. Better to be a peon than a pylon, I suppose.

  2. Hi Luis,

    I dont quite think KM is dead yet … at least, not in totality. Though, i havent gone through the interview (let me pour myself a Beer before i do that!), but i feel that KM is morphing … something which a lot of folks are talking about … the KM 2.0 story? Well well … maybe theres something here apart from just a new version!

    Cheers, Atul.

  3. Gen Millennium has learned to work around executive indifference to conversation enablement in the workplace and they use IM/VoIP, blogs/RSS, screen-sharing and other social tools to converse anytime, anywhere with anyone. What was once the “CKO” job is now, for those of us left, (a) enabling conversations, (b) adding meaning to information (”sense making”), and ( c) helping front-line people to use knowledge and technology tools and resources more effectively.

  4. But aren’t we ALL knowledge managers in the Web2.0/social software world? We manage our knowledge collaboratively with our peers. I now have reduced direct questions through my corporate blog, with people going there (and to my social bookmarks) rather than approaching me directly.

    How do I know this?

    Well, I check my blog hits, and also through social anecdotes of people saying things like, “I followed your blog entries on Notes8 widgets and got up and running without needing anything else”.

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