Wikis, Blogs and Other Points of Failure – Fear Not

4 thoughts on “Wikis, Blogs and Other Points of Failure – Fear Not”

  1. Pingback: The Obvious?
  2. People are fearful because the rise of well moderated community information spells the end of the “expert” a tenuous designation if ever there was one. Greenbaum is mourning the end of expert-driven facts. But the point is that traditional forms of media were less about facts and more about power and wealth. If you could own a press, or a paper or a radio station, you could pick the experts and give them a space to work. Traditional media set up this pattern in the first place.

    Blogs wikis and everything else simply extends this argument to its logical conclusion. If “expertise” so sanctioned has to do with showing up in print, then what does the likes of Greenbaum expect?

    The biggest mistake that Greenbaum makes however is confusing “writer” with “expert.” The fact is that blogs and wikis create space for learners who put ideas out for consideration, challenge and improvement. I find blogs published by “experts” to be as tiresome as Greenbaum’s writing. It comes pre-canned with no opening into conversation. The rest of us (who “get it”) throw stuff on our sites as much to say “what do you guys think of this” as we do to solidify some kind of reputation.

    Anyway, Greenbaum chooses to publish in a non-interactive medium and so we discuss and converse about his ideas over here. Who knows – if his “publication” had comments he might learn something. But he’d have to be open to that first.

    Blessed are the learners, for they shall inherit the wisdom of the world.

  3. Thanks a lot, folks, for the feedback comments and for dropping by! Welcome to elsua!

    Having commented already in Euan’s blog post I just cannot but agree completely with you, Chris, on your commentary. Even further I think I would expand a quote I really enjoyed:

    The fact is that blogs and wikis create space for learners who put ideas out for consideration, challenge and improvement so much so that in the end they themselves become experts in those areas they have challenged themselves to learn some more.

    Indeed, I certainly agree with you that it is far more engaging, and therefore much more rewarding, to engage in conversations where you feel you could actually contribute with your own voice and expertise than to listen to someone one way but without being able to participate further yourself. That one way collaboration may have worked in the past (To some extent) but giving the current business environment it is no longer sustainable on its own. The key is to be able to challenge yourself to leave your own silo(s) and engage further in the discussions taking place out there and continue collaborating with one another through that continued learning process.

    Failure to do so will bring you back into your own silo, and at which point the learning process will just be a lot slower, if not non-existent. By the way, I really like your closing remark ! What a great quote !

    Blessed are the learners, for they shall inherit the wisdom of the world

    (I just couldn’t help it)

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